REVIVE CIVILITY

in

Rochester, Minnesota

Join us by taking the Community Pledge:

To revive civility and respect in my community, I will make a conscious effort to:

  • Seek a variety of reliable news sources with different perspectives in order to learn more about the forces that divide — and unite — our community and our country.

  • Listen respectfully to people who have views different than my own, being mindful to avoid stereotyping and to not use language that is insulting or derogatory.

  • Encourage and support efforts to bring together people of different points of view in our community to have civil and respectful conversations.

  • Invite other people to join me in reviving civility in Rochester, Minnesota, and connect people with different perspectives in civil conversations to ensure a strong democracy.

Negotiating interpersonal power such that everyone’s voice is heard, and nobody’s voice is ignored.

— www.instituteforcivility.org

WHAT IS CIVILITY?

Definition by the League of Women Voters, Rochester:

“Civility is an essential element of a healthy society. Civility means disagreeing with each other with respect. It does not mean avoiding tough conversations or not sharing your perspective. It does mean staying in a conversation with someone who has different views, attempting to comprehend their viewpoint, and finding common ground with the goal of mutual understanding, not necessarily agreement.”

Civility means:

  • Having a free and respectful exchange of ideas.

  • Questioning, critiquing and disagreeing with respect.

  • Being present in the conversation, even if there are disagreements.

  • Being open to other people and other opinions without hostility.

  • Focusing on the common good — the good of the conversation and of the community

Civility does not mean:

  • Being passive; suppressing your opinions or thoughts.

  • Compromising your values and beliefs.

  • Interrupting other people as they speak.

  • Agreeing with other people “to keep the peace.”

  • Generalizing and stereotyping.

For more information about civility, visit the National Institute for Civil Discourse website  https://nicd.arizona.edu/

Free and respectful exchange of different ideas.

— www.instituteforcivility.org

EVENTS

Setting the Table for Civility

Thursday, April 12, 2018

6:00 to 7:45 p.m.

University of Minnesota Rochester, Room 417

Civil discussion about mandatory vaccinations, immigration & other topics of concern.

Learn to engage in conversations about difficult issues.

Event is free for Students and Community.

Snacks and materials provided.

Create Civility

Due to Weather, rescheduled to Thursday April 26th,

 6:30-7:30 p.m.

University of Minnesota Rochester, Room 417

“Create Civility” – A Free Art-Making Event

Event is free for Students and Community

Snacks and supplies provided

National Week of Conversation

Civility In Our Democracy – Building Bridges of Trust and Respect

Wednesday, April 25, 2018

 5:30- 7:00p.m.

Heintz Center – 1926 College View Rd E. Rochester, MN

During National Week of Conversation, Americans from all over the country will take a step to help bridge the political divides in our country. This session will offer the Rochester community an opportunity to engage each other across differences for understanding through civil discourse. The goal of this conversations is to help people learn from each other, build relationships and look for ways to reduce the growing polarization in our public life. We will offer skills building activities around listening across differences and explore questions together about what actions can individuals, candidates and members of the media take to help create a more positive tone in this year’s election?

Claiming and caring for your identity, needs and beliefs without degrading someone else.

– Tomas Spath and Cassandra Dahnke
Founders, Institute for Civility in Government

BACKGROUND

About the League of Women Voters Rochester

The League of Women Voters is a nonpartisan, activist, grassroots organization whose leaders believed that voters should play a critical role in democracy. It is recognized as a strong force in molding political leaders, shaping public policy and promoting informed citizen participation at all levels of government. Locally in April, 2018, the League is sponsoring Revive Civility Month.

About the National Institute for Civil Discourse (NICD)

The University of Arizona NICD is a nonpartisan center for advocacy, research and policy.

The NICD facilitates large scale change in the behavior and ideology of people and systems. We seek to return our country to its founding ideal: that government must be of the people, by the people, and for the people. The media, citizens, and elected officials all have roles to play in establishing a more positive and productive direction for American democracy.

https://nicd.arizona.edu/

About the Diversity Council

The mission of the Diversity Council is to create an equitable and inclusive community where all individuals are empowered, conscientious, and courageous. The Council offers numerous programs and resources for individuals, businesses and organizations to increase their awareness about diversity and inclusion and to support the goal of building an inclusive community.

https://www.diversitycouncil.org/

About Community Leaders Creating Change (CLCC)

A leadership-training program offered by Diversity Council. CLCC offers participants the opportunity to hone leadership skills such as community organizing, cross-cultural collaboration, public speaking, and project management. Each of these skills is critical to help close the gap between our diverse local population and our community leadership.

Participants in the 2017-2018 CLCC program have partnered with the League of Women Voters to promote civility among all community members.

League of Women Voters
University of Arizona National Institue for Civil Discourse logo
Diversity Council Logo
ReviveCivilityRoch@gmail.com